3 Critical Guides to ‘Thinking With Type’ for Any Content Creator

Letter (Font or Typeface)

“Typefaces are an essential resource employed by graphic designers, just as glass, stone, steel, and countless other materials are employed by architects. Graphic designers sometimes create their own fonts and custom lettering. More commonly, however, they tap the vast library of existing typefaces, choosing and combining them in response to a particular audience or situation. To do this with wit and wisdom requires knowledge of how – and why –  letterforms have evolved.

Words originated as gestures of the body. The first typefaces were directly modeled on the forms of calligraphy. Typefaces, however, are not bodily gestures –  they are manufactured images designed for infinite repetition. The history of typography reflects a continual tension between the hand and the machine, the organic and the geometric, the human body and the abstract system. These tensions, which marked the birth of printed letters over five hundred years ago, continue to energize typography today. […]

With the rise of industrialization and mass consumption in the nineteenth century came the explosion of advertising, a new form of communication demanding new kinds of typography. Big, bold faces were designed by distorting the anatomical elements of classical letters. Fonts of astonishing height, width, and depth appeared – expanded, contracted, shadowed, inlined, fattened, faceted, and floriated. Serifs abandoned their role as finishing details to become independent architectural structures, and the vertical stress of traditional letters migrated in new directions.”

Picking a Letter/Typeface That Fits Your Brand

When was the last time you took some time to select a font or typeface specifically for the project you were working on?

With so much to consider from a marketing perspective, it’s easy to overlook the small nuances of typeface. The truth is, most marketers have a handful of fonts that they like to stick  – mainly because they like them or they fit their brand, but this can quickly lead to monotony.

Thinking With Type challenges readers to think analytically about the smallest details and how they apply to the message you are delivering — its tone, the style of content, and the emotions that font evokes in the reader.

As the excerpt above states, every flourish on the typeface that you choose can change the way that it is received and the message that it ultimately conveys to your audience.

Different fonts trigger different emotional responses and associations in our minds (i.e. time periods, certain qualities, etc.) As a marketer or designer, take the time to fully understand what emotions you want to elicit in your audience so you can strategically choose a typeface that both evokes this emotion while being consistent with your brand.

This infographic from designer, Brandon Gaille helps explain some of the most common associations people have with different fonts:

Text (Copy and Content)

“Letters gather into words, words build into sentences. In typography, ‘text’ is defined as an ongoing sequence of words, distinct from shorter headlines or captions. The main block is often called the ‘body,’ comprising the principal mass of content. Also known as ‘running text,’ it can flow from one page, column, or box to another. Text can be viewed as a thing – a sound and sturdy object – or a fluid poured into the containers of page or screen. Text can be solid or liquid, body or blood.

As body, text has more integrity and wholeness than the elements that surround it, from pictures, captions, and page numbers to banners, buttons, and menus. Designers generally treat a body of text consistently, letting it appear as a coherent substance that is distributed across the spaces of a document. In digital media, long texts are typically broken into chunks that can be accessed by search engines or hypertext links. […]

Typography helped seal the literary notion of ‘the text’ as a complete, original work, a stable body of ideas expressed in an essential form. Before the invention of printing, handwritten documents were riddled with errors. Copies were copied from copies, each with its own glitches and gaps.”

The Importance of Formatting With Your Content

Unless you have a background in copywriting, you probably don’t consider how your sentences and paragraphs look visually, but you don’t need to be a copywriter to see the difference between a well-formatted blog post and a science textbook.

Modern consumers, instinctively gravitate towards text that looks lighter and easier to read…

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